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American Musicological Society

South-Central Chapter

About us

The AMS South-Central chapter includes the states of Georgia, Kentucky, and Tennessee. Members include professors, independent scholars, students, and those who love music history. If you are a member of the national American Musicological Society and live within the zip codes of our area (as determined by the national office), you are a member of our chapter. All are welcome to attend the annual chapter meetings. We do not charge chapter dues, but there is a conference fee at the chapter meeting.

 

 

 

 

Spring 2017 Meeting information

The South-Central Chapter of the American Musicological Society (AMS-SC) is pleased to announce its 2017 Annual Meeting, to be hosted by the University of Louisville in Louisville, KY. The meeting will begin on the morning of Friday, March 17, and will conclude by noon on Saturday, March 18.

Keynote Address, Friday 3/17, 4:30-5:30 pm

Daniel Goldmark (Case Western Reserve University)
“Sounds of a Melting Pot: Tin Pan Alley, Hollywood, and the Anxiety of Ethnic Identity”

This paper explores how the music associated with different ethnic and cultural groups, in particular turn of the century American Jewry, was cultivated and shaped largely by the evolving mass-media/entertainment industry—vaudeville, Tin Pan Alley, theatre, Broadway—and crystallized in early cinema. For a range of reasons, the various entertainment industries developed a more or less unified sound of the music of Jews portrayed via popular music, mainstream cinema, and (as a result) the larger mass culture in America, transforming music that had had historical links with Jewish themes into little more than cultural stereotypes.

 

| Contact President | | Contact Secretary | Site maintained by Marie Sumner Lott, last updated 02/28/2017