AMS - Library of Congress Lecture Series

The American Musicological Society and the Music Division of the Library of Congress are pleased to present a series of lectures highlighting musicological research conducted in the Division’s collections.

Upcoming Lectures

18 May 2017, 7 p.m., Madison Bldg., Montpelier Room: Christina Bashford, William Brooks, Gayle Sherwood Magee, Laurie Matheson, and Justin Vickers, "Johnnies, Tommies, and Sammies: Music and the WWI Alliance"

The presentation is described as follows: "Throughout World War I, musical cultures in Britain, Canada, and the United States were deeply entangled in the formation of 'The Allies.' As the war evolved, popular music exchanged and performed in all three cultures—filtered increasingly through U.S. publishers—provided remarkable insights into their changing views of each other, themselves, and the conflict. In 1914, Britain was directly involved and directly threatened; Canada, still a British colony, owed allegiance to the Crown but was three thousand miles removed; and the United States was officially neutral but in practice supported the allies and (after the Lusitania incident) was increasingly inclined towards engagement. By 1917 all three countries had become part of 'The Allies'; music, as this presentation demonstrates, played a central role in binding the three countries together."

Drawing primarily on the Library of Congress’s recently digitized copyright deposits from the period, and contextualized by a study of the newspapers in Chronicling America, recordings from National Jukebox, and other materials from American Memory, six participants—musicologists Christina Bashford, William Brooks, and Gayle Magee, and performers Justin Vickers, Laurie Matheson, and Geoffrey Duce—offer an integrated lecture-performance that manifests in its design the process of alliance that occurred a century ago. Bashford, Brooks, and Magee are from Britain, the United States, and Canada, respectively; and they will each speak about and through their respective country’s musics. The presentation is not a series of papers but rather a single, collaboratively authored text, partitioned among the speakers in a series of scripted encounters, and illustrated with slides, films, period recordings, and live performances of sheet music.

Susan Forscher Weiss (Peabody Institute, Johns Hopkins University) will introduce the presenters.




 

Call for Lecture Proposals

Follow this link for full instructions if you are interested in participating in the AMS/LC Lecture Series. The next deadline is 16 January 2018 .

Past Lectures

Click here for information on previous lectures, including links to the webcasts:


  • Fall 2016: Dominic McHugh, "In the Workshop of Lerner and Loewe: Archival Sources for the Genesis of My Fair Lady"
  • Spring 2016: R. Larry Todd, “Revisiting Mendelssohn’s Octet, or the Maturing of Precocity”
  • Fall 2015: Ryan Raul Bañagale, "The Ongoing Composition of Rhapsody in Blue"
  • Spring 2015: Paul Laird, "'A Hint of West Side Story': The Genesis of Bernstein's Chichester Psalms as Seen in the Library of Congress Bernstein Collection"
  • Fall 2014: Carol Hess, "Copland as Good Neighbor: Cultural Diplomacy in Latin America During World War II"
  • Spring 2014: Nancy Newman, "'A program not greatly to their credit': Finding New Perspectives on the Germania Musical Society through the American Memory Sheet Music Collection"
  • Fall 2013: Kendra Preston Leonard, "Meaning and Myth in Louise Talma’s First Period Works"
  • Spring 2013: Todd Decker, "Making Show Boat: Jerome Kern, Oscar Hammerstein II, and the Power of Performers"
  • Fall 2012: Barbara Heyman, "Samuel Barber: Serendipitous Discoveries"
  • Spring 2012: Thomas Brothers, "Louis Armstrong: The Making of a Great Melodist"
  • Fall 2011: William Meredith, "What the Autograph Can Tell Us:
    Beethoven’s Sonata in E Major, opus 109"
  • Winter 2011: Carol J. Oja, "Bernstein Meets Broadway:
    Race, the Blues, and On the Town (1944)"
  • Fall 2010: W. Anthony Sheppard, "American Musical Modernism and Japan"
  • Spring 2010: Steve Swayne, "William Schuman’s Puzzling Seventh Symphony"
  • Fall 2009: Walter Frisch, "Arnold Schoenberg's Creative Journey, 1897-1912"
  • Spring 2009: Jeffrey Magee, "Now It Can Be Told: The Unknown Irving Berlin"
  • Fall 2008: Annegret Fauser, "After Pearl Harbor: Music, War, and the Library of Congress"
  • Spring 2008: Judith Tick, "Ruth Crawford Seeger, Modernist Composer in the Folk Revival:
    Biography as Music History”
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